Posts tagged pop culture

She did the Secretary of State job, she was a G, she held it down, she didn’t cry.

Ice-T, on why Hillary Clinton will be the first female president 

The best part about this story is that the Huffington Post (via the AP) decided to explain to us what a “G” is. In case you didn’t know — it’s “the hip-hop term for gangster (a positive thing)”. 

(via newsweek)

I love Ice-T as much as the next girl, but ‘she didn’t cry?’ Really, Ice? Glad you’re ready for a female president but could you check the sexism, pls?

(via motherjones)

2,052 notes

#sexism

#politics

#pop culture

kitchenknivesandcherrybombs:

sade:

Gays Against Gaga

this exists.

This exists and I effing love it. Immediate follow.

kitchenknivesandcherrybombs:

sade:

Gays Against Gaga

this exists.

This exists and I effing love it. Immediate follow.

363 notes

#lgbt

#pop culture

#fuck yeah

It’s everyone’s own decision to do that. It doesn’t affect me and shouldn’t affect anyone else.

Justin Bieber on homosexuality

I dunno about you guys, but I certainly made a decision to make myself a target for bigotry! I thought it sounded like too much fun to pass up! (via queerwatch)

Although he’s ignorant in labeling being gay as a decision, he’s on the right track with “it doesn’t affect me and shouldn’t affect anyone else.” I definitely prefer this response over his comments about abortion. He’s very inarticulate overall.

(via lgbtqblogs)

50 notes

#lgbt

#pop culture

Since we all came from a woman, got our name from a woman, and our game from a woman. I wonder why we take from women, why we rape our women, do we hate our women? I think its time we killed for our women, be real to our women, try to heal our women, ‘cause if we don’t we’ll have a race of babies that will hate the ladies, who make the babies. And since a man can’t make one he has no right to tell a woman when and where to create one.

2,648 notes

#pop culture

#fuck yeah

pinkpanthers:

dead-end-street:

Jane Lynch  and her wife Lara Embry; the newlyweds

62nd Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - August 29, 2010



Gorgeous couple!

pinkpanthers:

dead-end-street:

Jane Lynch and her wife Lara Embry; the newlyweds

62nd Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - August 29, 2010

Gorgeous couple!

22 notes

#photos

#pop culture

In rape culture today: rape justification in entertainment

tralalalicia:

This scene was so haunting and emotionally charged.

Even though Spike was trying to force himself on Buffy, my heart ached for him, not her. He didn’t want to hurt her, he just wanted her to feel something for him. 

He isn’t used to loving someone like that, and it hurt him. And the things she has said to him hurt him all the more because of what happened to him when he was human. I think he felt useless, like a kicked puppy. He just wanted her to admit she felt something for him.

And the way he looked when he realized what he did. So sad. I have a theory that if his chip still worked for her, it wouldn’t have done anything to him because he didn’t intend to hurt her. 

This is not the first post like this I’ve seen. Some of them have even been more overt in putting the blame on Buffy, the victim of this attack. But it’s the last straw and I feel compelled to say something about it. I understand that this is a TV show and people get attached to the characters. But unfortunately, the opinion of this poster has roots in reality and scary ones at that. What I just read makes me feel sick to my stomach. How can anyone watch a scene of attempted rape, one in which the woman is being held down, groped against her will, begging her assailant to stop, and say that her attacker “didn’t want to hurt her” and he just wants her to “admit she felt something for him?” Talk about rape culture. Talk about victim blaming.

So, it’s Buffy’s fault that Spike had a shitty life as a human? It’s Buffy’s fault that he has inadequacy issues? I’m not even going to touch on the fact that the rest of the relationship (during season 6) we’re shown between these characters is sick and abusive. Just look at this scene. The character of Buffy in this scene is symbolic of every woman who is ever assaulted by a partner or someone else she trusts. Rape and sexual assault are never, ever justified. It doesn’t matter that the character of Spike is emotionally crippled. It doesn’t matter that he’s obsessed with her. Spike’s issues do not excuse his assault. They do not erase the blame for his deplorable actions. If you love someone and they rebuff your attempt to have sex with them, YOU DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE WHAT YOU WANT BY FORCE. You do not have the right to make them “admit” they want you. The facts of this scene are as follows: Buffy says no and Spike does not stop. The only reason he doesn’t actually penetrate her is because she’s able to fight him off. The end. Even if I actually believed that he “didn’t intend to hurt her,” it wouldn’t matter one single bit. Actions are what matter.

Now, this is a TV show. Spike is a vampire, whom we are told and shown is evil. So frankly, I don’t have a problem with a storyline in which a creature that’s supposed to be evil hurts a human being. That’s the way it goes and we’re watching science fiction here. But I do have a problem when I see blatant rape justification bullshit both from the writers of this show and the fans. To me, Joss Whedon lost what little feminist cred he had after this moment. Don’t show me a graphic scene like this and then have your writers going around blabbing about what a fantastic love story the Spike/Buffy storyline is. Physical violence, sexual assault, and emotional abuse are not evidence of love, writers. If you wanna go with the dark storyline, by all means, do it. But don’t give me abuse and call it romance.

And please, fangirls, think about what you’re saying for a moment. I know you think Spike so hot and he’s some kind of tortured lost puppy. But sexual assault is always, absolutely without fail the fault of the attacker. There is no excuse for it. There is no rationalization. “You made me hurt you” is the mentality of an abuser. And as a human beings, we cannot subscribe to that. This may be a TV show, but the messages it projects is bigger than that.

4 notes

#pop culture

#rape culture

#violence against women

#wtf

#btvs

Hugh Hefner, gay rights champion? ›

In Hugh Hefner: Playboy, Activist and Rebel, Oscar-winning filmmaker Brigitte Berman reveals that there’s much more to the man than just someone who peddled naughty pictures of naked gals. The film carefully documents how Hefner gave millions of dollars to help bankroll feminist legal fights, fought against segregation in the southern US and championed gay-themed stories long before Stonewall.

[…]


Queers will find intrigue in an anecdote about Hefner’s insistence on publishing a gay-themed story in 1955, at the very height of the Cold War and anti-communist and homophobic hysteria. Charles Beaumont had written a sci-fi short story titled “The Crooked Man,” in which the hetero-homo roles were cleverly reversed. He described a world dominated by homosexuals, in which heterosexuals had to lie about who and what they were and meet in seedy underground clubs. (Beaumont wrote several episodes of cult TV series The Twilight Zone — fans will recognize his style and its connection to that show.) It’s a unique story that proved too much for the editorial board of Esquire, who rejected it outright.

Hefner picked it up and ran with it, much to the dismay of many of his readers, some of who responded with angry letters. “It prompted mixed reaction at the time because it was not clearly understood. We printed a response in the magazine in which we said that in addition to thinking it was a strong work of fiction, we thought the message was an important one: that if it’s wrong to persecute heterosexuals in a homosexual society, then the reverse was wrong too. Beaumont was a great writer. It was Ray Bradbury who had first brought him to my attention.”

There are other tall-but-true tales as well. In the ’60s, with Playboy's popularity spreading, the company sold franchises across the country so people could open Playboy nightclubs. But Hefner was aghast to learn that some of those Playboy clubs in the southern states were segregated. He returned to the clubs, bought back the franchise rights at his own expense and then immediately racially integrated them. “I couldn't stand the idea that Playboy would be associated with the continuation of racial segregation,” he says now.

Throughout the ’50s, Hefner published numerous stories by then-blacklisted writers, those targeted by Joseph McCarthy and others during the ideological witch-hunts — a move that prompted Ronald Reagan to write to Hefner and urge him to stop employing such scribes. “I still have the letter. I had it framed and put up on my wall.”

Hefner says he’s still surprised when critics accuse him of being an arch sexist. “I’m so blindsided [that] the more conservative feminists attacked me. I didn’t know what that was all about. Most of the early lower-court cases involving birth control and abortion were funded by the Playboy Foundation…. I thought we were always fighting the good fight on the same side.”

Hmm, I dunno, I am reluctant to embrace Hefner as some social justice champion. Thoughts?

1 note

#lgbt

#feminism

#racism

#pop culture

Essence Hires White Fashion Director: Business or Betrayal? ›

I’m not sure how to feel about this honestly… And I think perhaps the new hire may be Latina? But ultimately, I think if Essence is aimed toward black women, it should be creating fashion that they can be comfortable in and love. Can a woman who is not African American really work toward this goal effectively? Were there no black women as qualified?

I know it feels a little wrong to say, this person shouldn’t work here because of the color of her skin. But there’s a reason why there’s a black Miss America, a black history month, a pride month for LGBT people, etc. It’s a reaction to a past history of exclusion. Or in the case of the fashion industry, current exclusion for women of color. I guess what bothers me outside of the actual facts of the situation is the spirit of the thing. This is a publication for black women. It’s one of the few spaces that belongs exclusively to them, and now it’s been infiltrated. To me it says, hey black women, we brought in a white woman to show you how it’s done. And I don’t like the way that feels at all.

#racism

#pop culture

Of course I have. I’m an actor for fuck’s sake. I’ve played with everything and everyone.

6 notes

#gay and awesome

#pop culture

#random

Eminem, Rihanna and domestic violence: Or, how Eminem almost tricked me (again) ›

queerwatch:

(via genderacrossborders)

“While my initial thought was that no one could possibly find Eminem’s character in this song forgivable, rape culture by its very nature forgives and rewards precisely this kind of rage. And my concern is that the song’s very misogyny, combined with the catchiness of the beat and Rihanna’s refrain, are what have made this song so popular.

After all, this is Eminem, we’re talking about. **The same Eminem who offered to “Put anthrax on a tampax and slap you till you can’t stand.”  The same notorious homophobe who has rapped graphically about murdering his ex-wife. The same guy who has written songs about raping girls with umbrellas.** And the same Eminem whose wrath against feminists made me swear at the age of 13 that I would never, ever be one, because I certainly didn’t want to be part of a group of people that was making this guy angry.

Still, when this song came out, I almost forgave him again.

Part of Eminem’s forgivability has to do with his whiteness, as numerous critics have pointed out. Bloggers have also written about the media’s love for Eminem, and the way his “complicated” rebel image, combined with his whiteness, have sugarcoated his misogyny.”

I’m glad someone else posted this. I’ve been feeling pretty conflicted about this song myself. To me, it’s painful to hear someone who I know has experienced domestic violence singing “I like the way it hurts.” I’ve been reluctant to criticize Rihanna’s decision to sing on this song because I certainly don’t want to tell any woman who’s been through the experience she has how she should react, feel, or deal with it. It’s not the way I’ve dealt with the domestic violence I’ve experienced and witnessed, but I don’t think she should be further stripped of power by telling her how she, as a survivor, has to act. But it does make me very uncomfortable. And I think her portion of the song has a negative connotation to it, because it implies that the abused person is forgiving and accepting the behavior which makes it their fault. Yes, victims do forgive abusers and stay with them, but narrowing it down to only this ignores the many other factors going into these situations.

As for Eminem’s portion, I don’t view his character as sympathetic. The character to me is every man out there who beats his girlfriend and I hate that image. I’m hesitant to label this song as one that glorifies domestic violence. I hope it’s more a commentary on it, from someone who’s been on the other side and regrets his actions. Or maybe I’m just being too optimistic and the inclusion of Rihanna in the song is softening it up for me. Obviously, I don’t know this man so I have no idea what his intentions were. I do overall find the song to be disturbing, not just for the lyrics or the fact that it’s so catchy, but because I’m listening to an admitted abuser detailing his abuse while a victim is softening the song with her voice and her complicit lyrics. What do others think?

34 notes

#violence against women

#pop culture

Page 1 of 2

1

2

Next ›